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Museum, Parks & Zoos / Museums, parks & zoos

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Kinderfreundliches Museum / suitable to children
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==> 84 Einträge gefunden / entries found

Botanical Collections

Hviezdoslavova 29a
CZ-60200 Brno / Brünn (Jihomoravský / Südmähren)


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Kontakt / Contact:
Tel.: +420 5 45 21 70 03

Info Telefon: +420 545 217 322
Besucher-Email: botanika@mzm.cz
http://www.mzm.cz/oddeleni/botanicke_odd...

 
Träger/Financial provider:
Moravian Museum, Brno

 
Sammelschwerpunkte/Main collections
Regional Mushrooms and Herbarium.

Picture: Wooden model by J. Rulisek of a Boletus Satanas.
 


Klöster in diesem Ort / Monasteries in this city

Leos Janacek’ s Memorial Museum

Smetanova 14
CZ-60200 Brno / Brünn (Jihomoravský / Südmähren)


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Info Telefon: +420 541 212 811
Besucher-Email: fmaly@mzm.cz
http://www.mzm.cz/mzm/expozice/pamatnik_...

 
Träger/Financial provider:
Moravian Museum, Brno

 
Öffnungszeiten/Opening hours
Monday -closed-
Tuesday -closed-
Wednesday 1 p.m.—4 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m.—12 a.m. 1 p.m.—4 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m.—12 a.m. 1 p.m.—4 p.m.
Saturday -closed-
Sunday -closed.

 
Sammelschwerpunkte/Main collections
The recently renovated "Janácek's House" shows the original spacial disposition. In the sitting room the visitor can see the exhibition on the masterpieces composed just there containing the facsimiles of the autographs of the compositions, their first printed versions as well as objects of the composer's everyday use. In the study, the original furniture is conserved including the piano. In the modern audio-visual hall, the visitor can watch several movies on the composer and his work and listen to Janácek's compositions.

 


Klöster in diesem Ort / Monasteries in this city

Mendelianum

Údolní 39
CZ-60200 Brno / Brünn (Jihomoravský / Südmähren)


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Info Telefon: +420 542 216 216
Besucher-Email: genetika@mzm.cz

 
Träger/Financial provider:
Moravian Museum, Brno

 
Öffnungszeiten/Opening hours
Monday 8 a.m.—4 p.m.
Tuesday 8 a.m.—4 p.m.
Wednesday 8 a.m.—4 p.m.
Thursday 8 a.m.—4 p.m.
Friday 8 a.m.—4 p.m.
Saturday -closed-
Sunday closed.

 
Sammelschwerpunkte/Main collections
In 1865 an Augustinian priest Gregor Mendel created a genetical theory on the origin and development of plant hybrids. His theory became the basis of a new science on heredity and variation - genetics.

Most of us think of peas when speaking about Mendel's discovery. It is the plant Gregor J. Mendel used for his famous hybridisation experiments thank to which the modern genetics came into being many years later. Maybe, somebody remembers in this context some of his other experimental plants - hawkweed and bean, but many other plants he experimented with after he had published his discovery made on peas are still unknown with the large public. In the garden in front of Mendelianum (on the ground floor of the ombudsman's office, Údolní 39) the visitors can now get acquainted with many other plants Mendel experimented with. For the first time in this country as well as abroad, the visitors can see on one place such an extensive collection of live plants and ask the question why Mendel continued his experiments with other plants after having published his discovery. The Mendelianum (Department of Genetics, Moravian Museum) has pursued since 40 years the study of the scientific heritage of the founder of genetics and focused on the development of genetics and other biological sciences in the country and abroad.

Picture: Garden with Mendel' s experimental plants.
 


Klöster in diesem Ort / Monasteries in this city

Museum of industrial Railways, Brno

Artur Fucík - Smetanova 30
CZ-60200 Brno / Brünn (Jihomoravský / Südmähren)


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Info Telefon: +420 606 832 394
Besucher-Email: fucik@mpz.cz


Klöster in diesem Ort / Monasteries in this city

Museum of Romani Culture

Bratislavská 67
CZ-60200 Brno / Brünn (Jihomoravský / Südmähren)


Google Maps



Kontakt / Contact:
Tel.: +420 545 571 798
Fax.: +420 545 214 418

Info Telefon: +420 545 581 206
Besucher-Email: sekretariat@rommuz.cz
http://www.rommuz.cz...

 
Sponsor/Sponsors:
Microsoft

 
Öffnungszeiten/Opening hours
Tuesday - Friday
10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday
10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Monday and Saturday closed

 
Sammelschwerpunkte/Main collections
Museum of Romani Culture was founded in 1991 in Brno, Czech Republic based on the initiative of Romani and non-Romani Czech intellectuals and experts and with support from the Czech Ministry of Culture. The mission and activity of the museum follows the heritage of the Association of the Gypsies-Romanies (1969 – 1973). It is the first, and so far the only, institution of its kind in Europe. Its aim is the expert collection of records and documents which give evidence of the material and spiritual culture of the Roma and their coexistence with the majority population from the past to the present time. In 2005, the Museum of Romani Culture transformed into a state institution under the Ministry of Culture of the Czech Republic.

The museum’s permanent exhibition tells the story of the Roma through world history. You can trace the Roma’s culture and changes in their lifestyle beginning in India up to the present day. The exhibition is situated on one entire floor of the museum, consisting of six halls, the total area of which is 326,4 m2.

The 5th hall of the total exhibition area represents the period 1945 – 1989. It is a follow-up to the hall focused on the period of the holocaust that leaves the impression of desperation, sorrow and tragedy through its black tones and overall darkened design. Therefore, the design of the 5th hall should cheer the visitors and make them feel comfortably and secure again. This hall is divided in two different parts.

At the very beginning, visitors can learn more about the groups of Roma that existed within the territory of former Czechoslovakia after 1945, and about Romani – their language and its development from the spoken to the written form. Selected Romani authors are portrayed on the specifically designed displays that include photos and extracts of their work.


The whole exhibition is accompanied by quotations from Roma commenting on specific historical events or particular aspects of Romani culture.

This hall also introduces one of the recent and not to be missed phenomenons of the Roma culture – visual arts by both professional and amateur authors. Many paintings and ceramic sculptures are spread across the walls, while wooden carvings are held in the display cases. The above mentioned displays contain more information about the authors of these artworks.

The smaller part (part A) explains the historical development during the stated period, the most significant milestones concerning the Roma within the history of Czechoslovakia. The information here represents the opinion of the then state regarding the Roma. The overall attitude towards the Roma is indicated by the gray colour of the displays and the floor. Here you can see primarily written and archive documents concerning individual events, photos, original collection items, and newspaper articles. Some of the most interesting exhibits in this part are a replica of a work certificate dated 1947, stamps and badges of the Gypsy/Roma Union, the Romani flag, and photos by Eva Davidova, a prominent Czech ethnographer.


The larger part (part B) introduces the Roma from inside their own community, their culture and tradition, but –first of all – the way these changed during the 40 years. The conception of this part of the exhibition and its layout are deliberately different from the previous „gray“ part. The walls are painted bright pink with a red floral pattern. This is not a coincidence – similar colours and patterns can still be found in many Romani homes. The design is completed by a red carpet indicating a kher (a Romany dwelling). The display cases are covered by a woven wicker cover, the traditional material used by the Roma, and thus symbolizing a link of today’s Roma to the traditional life and livelihood. These displays show traditional customs and events (christening, wedding, funeral, anniversary), the types of housing in the traditional environment of Romani settlements and in new homes in Bohemia, the religion and faith of the Roma, clothing, crafts, music, dance and theatre. The last display case is dedicated to the influence of the Romani culture on the culture of the majority. The most interesting exhibits include a decorated holy corner with many sculptures, holy pictures and family photos, the Romanian Romani princess Luminita’s dress, the Olash Roma’s jewelry, artefacts made by the Roma metalcraftsmen, marionettes symbolizing the Romani men or women, etc.


In this hall, visitors can have a seat and watch the audio-visual recording of traditional and contemporary Romani music performances. Moreover, while viewing the display cases containing the evidence of the influence of the Roma culture to the environment, visitors can listen to the audio samples of the Czech and foreign literary works that were inspired by the Romani lifestyle and culture.


The 6th hall provides an uncommented upon mosaic of current trends in the development of the relationship between the Romani minority and the majority population from 1989 up to the present day. The walls are covered by articles from the Czech, Slovak, Romani and foreign press concerning such topics as racism, discrimination, education of the Roma, culture, social conditions, etc. In the middle of the hall, a swiveling pillar covered by brief quotations from the press symbolizes the permanent progress of present events around each of us. This is supported by two television sets showing a montage of TV shots, reports and documents of today’s life of the Roma in our country as well as abroad.

Picture: (c) Dr. Adelheid Straten

 


Klöster in diesem Ort / Monasteries in this city

The House of the Lords of Kunstát

Dominikánská 9
CZ-60200 Brno / Brünn (Jihomoravský / Südmähren)


Google Maps




Info Telefon: +420 542 423 440-5
http://www.mzm.cz/mzm/expozice/dum_panu_...

 
Sammelschwerpunkte/Main collections
The building dates back to the mid-14th century where several town houses were built on the plot. In the late 16th century the Gothic houses were transformed in a Renaissance palace. It had been used then as a residence of prominent Moravian noble families during many years until its last owner, Maxmilian baronet of Deblín, sold it to the the municipality. The town authorities transformed then the building installing shops in it, from the mid-18th century to the World War II the building was the seat of various offices. In the 1950s the house was adapted according to the project of the architect Mojmír Kyselka.
DatenbankMueller-StratenMuc2007
In 1958 the House of Arts of the city of Brno started to use the building. On the ground floor, the then director Adolf Kroupa decided to install a Cabinet of Graphic Arts, a Cabinet of Architecture and a Cabinet of Photography that were the first specialized exhibition rooms of this kind in this country.
In 1990 the building was closed due to the necessity of renovation. Because of the lack of money, the renovation work was stopped two years later. In 2000 the City Council decided to finance the reconstruction of the building from the city budget and the overhaul was completed in the late 2002.
In May 2003 the Brno House of Arts re-opend there the exhibition rooms on the first floor. The permanent exhibition "Leos Janácek and Brno" prepared by the Moravian Museum was inaugurated on January 24, 2004.
 


Klöster in diesem Ort / Monasteries in this city

The Mahen Monument

Mahenova 8
CZ-60200 Brno / Brünn (Jihomoravský / Südmähren)


Google Maps




Info Telefon: +420 543 248 479
Besucher-Email: cerna@kjm.cz?subject=Museums
http://www.kjm.cz/...

 
Sammelschwerpunkte/Main collections
Since 1992, Mahen monument, belongs to the monuments in Brno connected with this name.. It was built as a permanent reminder of the personality Jiri Mahen in accordance with Mrs. Karly Mahenova, widow of Mahen, in the Masaryk-quarters, where Jiri Mahen lived until his death.
Interested parties may visit his study, preserved in its original state. The equipment is typical of the apartments of the intellectuals of the 30ies and comes from the workshop of architect Jan Vanka. The furniture was restored by Artes. On the walls are paintings of modern Czech painters, in parts dedicated by the Mahen nephew Oldrich Haselmann given to the Moravian Museum. Jiri Mahen was the founder and long-term librarian of the city library.

Picture: Marie Schmerkova
 


Klöster in diesem Ort / Monasteries in this city

The Menin Gate

Menínská 7
CZ-60200 Brno / Brünn (Jihomoravský / Südmähren)


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Kontakt / Contact:
Fax.: +420 542 211 584

Info Telefon: +420 542 214 946
Besucher-Email: muzeum.brno@spilberk.cz
http://www.spilberk.cz/...

 
Träger/Financial provider:
City Museum of Brno

 
Sammelschwerpunkte/Main collections
Since the thirteenth century Brno has been an important political, administrative and economic centre both within the context of Moravia as well as all the lands of the Kingdom of Bohemia. For centuries, the city’s fortifications made it one of the best-protected cities in Europe. This fact is documented by several unsuccessful attempts to take the city (the most famous from a historical point of view was the Swedish siege in 1645; others include the 1663 siege of Brno by the Turks).

The city’s fortifications were technologically very sophisticated with many prominent experts in the field – including Giovanni Tansini, Louis François de Rochet and Pierre Philippe de Rochepin – having made contributions to their initial construction and later refurbishments, in particular during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Following the significant economic development of Brno over the course of the nineteenth century and the associated urban expansion and gradual settlement of areas outside the Medieval and Baroque walls, the system of city fortifications gradually disappeared.

Brno’s city walls have been continuously documented in detail since the period between 1243-1247. Their origins can be dated to the first third of the thirteenth century. The city’s ramparts and moats are mentioned in the Great City Privilege of Brno, issued by King Wenceslas I in January 1243; they are also mentioned around 1260 in the charters of Pøemysl Otakar II.

In their classic form, the city’s fortifications were strengthened with a system of towers and bastions, whose task was to reinforce and make their defence easier. In the fourteenth century, Brno’s system of fortifications consisted of a city wall with a forward ward wall and a moat. The towers were strengthened with some fifty bastions, located forty meters from each other. At the same time, the towers themselves reinforced the ward wall. The area enclosed by the fortifications totalled about 36 hectares, which made Brno the fourth largest city in the Czech state, after Prague, Wroclaw and Olomouc. After 1486, the city fortifications were extended in the vicinity of the Augustinian monastery. In the sixteenth century, the city system of fortifications was strengthened and reconstructed. As a part of this work, all the gates were gradually reinforced with barbicans. The inner wall was protected with forty-three towers and the ward wall with eleven towers.

Brno’s system of fortifications was completely refurbished after the Thirty Years War, when Brno, together with Špilberk Castle, was transformed into a Baroque fortress beginning in the 1660s according a plan by Giovanni Tansini. This transformation was complemented in the 1730s by Pierre Philippe de Rochepin with an outside bastion belt that was destroyed in 1809, together with a part of Špilberk Castle’s fortification, by Napoleon’s armies.

During the nineteenth century, the medieval inner city wall was demolished and the filling of moats was begun in 1823. In the meantime, city gates gradually disappeared. By 1817, there were no longer gates on Veselá and Bìhounská Streets. The Jewish Gate was demolished in 1835 and replaced with the Classicist Ferdinand Gate, which however, lasted only until 1864. The Brno Gate disappeared in 1848-1852, and the system of bastions was demolished between 1858 and 1863, when Greater Brno began to take form.

The Baroque city fortifications have disappeared completely, but tiny fragments of the original medieval walls have been preserved, mainly in the cellars of buildings located on the site of the original fortifications (in particular Bašty, Petrov Hill, the Denis Park, and Dominikánská and Husova Streets).

Beginning in the thirteenth century, the inner city has been accessed through five gates – the Bìhounská, Veselá, Brno (“Brnìnská”), Jewish (“Židovská”) and Mìnín (“Mìnínská”) gates. The gates had also exits for pedestrians, designated as doors (portulae). Until the middle of the eighteenth century, entry into the city was possible only through the Brno (on today’s Šilingr Square (Šilingrovo namìstí) at the end of Starobrnìnská Street), Veselá (at the junction of Veselá and Èeská Streets) and Jewish, later Ferdinand (on Masarykova Street) gates. These entrances to the city were located in the outer fortifications belt and there were roads leading to them. The other gates were only intended for internal use by city inhabitants.

The only gate to have survived (although in a considerably altered form) the demise of Brno’s city fortifications is Mìnín Gate. It has become the only visible fragment remaining of the original system of city walls.

The Mìnín Gate was named after the surrounding city quarter and was located at the mouth of Mìnínská (today Orlí) Street. Mentioned as the fifth of the city’s gates, it is the only exit from the city that has been preserved and remains in use today. It is quite exceptional that only one street leads to it – some historians tend to consider this as evidence a certain deviation from the city plan and believe that there were originally two convergent streets meeting at the gate, one of which was later built over. But also this theory also has its opponents.

The first written mention of the gate can be found in a proclamation from June 1293, concerning the resolution of a dispute concerning parish borders between the Churches of St. Peter and St. James. The border between the two parishes demarcated after an examination of written documents and hearings before a commission consisting of church and secular official, presided over by Conrad, the Abbot of the Cistercian monastery in Velehrad. The commission decided to check and delimit the parishes’ border in person and therefore made an inspection of the area in question, beginning in Old Brno and following the newly established border between the two parishes, i. e. from the Brno Gate along Dolní Street, the Old Marketplace and then directly to the Mìnín Gate.

The Mìnín Gate is the only one in the medieval system of city fortifications to have changed its position. As of the year 1293, it is recorded as having been on a line connecting line Kobližná and Jánská Streets; in 1348, however, there is only a city door mentioned at that location, while the new Mìnín Gate is located one street further to the south.

The architecture of the present gate dates to around the year 1500. At the end of the sixteenth century, more precisely in 1593, a tower clock made by a clockmaker from Pøibice u Vranova was noted. The clock can be well seen in a painting showing the 1645 Swedish siege of Brno. According to city accounts, the painter Johannes created an “eine Uhrplatte” in the Mìnín Gate. In 1692, the clock on the gate was upgraded by Gottfried Pobinger, a Brno burgher and clockmaker.

The gate originally had four storeys although some sources mention it as a three-storey building. By the mid-seventeenth century it had lost its importance and purpose as a massive bastion had been built in front of it during Baroque fortress construction. In 1839, the Gate was lowered, all its ornamentation was removed and it was turned into a residential structure. The Gate lost its function as a passage in 1847-1849. By the mid-nineteenth century it was in very poor condition; it was purchased by a lady merchant from Brno who used its cellars for the maturation of “tvarùžky” – a strong-smelling cheese from the Olomouc region – that she herself imported to Brno. She then used the money obtained from her business to repair the gate, which then served as home for four generations of her family. In 1945, it was badly damaged by artillery.

The last owner of the Navrátil family, who had lived in the gate for almost a century, donated it to the city of Brno in the late 1960s. The city re-sold it, but it remained unused and decaying until it was returned to the property of the city of Brno (in 1978).

Following this period of decline, the city of Brno provided funds for the renovation of the Mìnín Gate (1978-1982) according to plans by the architect Kamil Fuchs. In February 1982, it came under the administration of the Brno City Museum and became a part of its exhibition space. It was opened to the public on 5 May 1983 with the exhibition “Brno and Weapons over the Centuries”. In the early 1990s, its underground rooms were briefly used as a wine bar.

At present, the Mìnín Gate is used by Brno City Museum for permanent and temporary exhibitions, lectures and concerts. The first exhibition to be held on the premises of the gate – as was mentioned above – was followed between 1986 and 1989 by several temporary shows. Today, the Mìnín gate houses the exhibition “Gate of Time”, which presents the results of archaeological excavations carried out within the city of Brno.

Written by PhDr. Dagmar Baumannová, CSc.
Translation PhDr. Kateøina Tlachová

 


Klöster in diesem Ort / Monasteries in this city

The Museum of Ethnography - Noble Women’s Palace

Koblizná 1
CZ-60200 Brno / Brünn (Jihomoravský / Südmähren)


Google Maps




Info Telefon: +420 542 422 361
http://www.mzm.cz/mzm/oddeleni/etnografi...

 
Träger/Financial provider:
The Moravian Museum, Brno

 
Öffnungszeiten/Opening hours
Monday -closed-
Tuesday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.
Wednesday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.
Sunday closed.

 
Sammelschwerpunkte/Main collections
The house "U slechticen" (At noble-women) was erected between 1674 and 1679 in the "the baroque town palace style" by Brno architect Jan Krtitel Erna. V. J. Eidelberger adapted the palace in the 1790. The palace originally served as a charity facility for derilict noble and burgher young women.
 


Klöster in diesem Ort / Monasteries in this city

The New Museum Anthropos (ex: Pavillon Anthropos)

Pisárecká 5
CZ-60200 Brno / Brünn (Jihomoravský / Südmähren)
 Kinderfreundliches Museum / suitable to children


Google Maps




Info Telefon: +420 543 212 415
http://www.mzm.cz/mzm/expozice/anthropos...

 
Sponsor/Sponsors:
Starobrno, Czesky Rozhlas 106.5 FM, Central Europe Exhibition Centre

 
Öffnungszeiten/Opening hours
Monday -closed-
Tuesday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.
Wednesday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.
Sunday 9 a.m.—5 p.m.

 
Sammelschwerpunkte/Main collections
One of the most modern museums in the Czech Republic. The tradition of our Anthropos Pavilion roots back in the years of the Republic of Czechoslovakia (1918-1938). Thanks to the enormous efforts of distinguished Czech researcher professor PhD. Karel Absolon in 1928 our museum was able to open an unique exhibition made out of foundings from very earl periods of human history. The exhibition entitled ANTHROPOS received a great support from the president T.G. Masaryk and the well-known enterprenour, Mr. Tomas Bata. During WWII the exhibition was closed. It was professor dr. Jan Jelinek, internationally recognized anthropologist and museologist (former director of Moravian Museum and president of ICOM), who folowed the idea of the founders of ANTHROPOS. In 1962 the newly built Anthropos Pavilion hosted its first visitors.

The permanent exhibition on the oldest history of the settlement in Moravia as well as on the whole European continent consists of three parts created by our outstanding specialists: "Moravian Hunters and Gatherers", "The oldest Art of Europe" (author of the script M. Oliva) and "Palaeolithic Technologies" (authors Z. and P. Neruda). The second part brings up-to-date discoveries concerning the evolution of man and the beginnings of his culture: "Genetics in the Evolution of Man" (J. Sekerák), "The Story of Mankind" (Z. Šmahel, M. Doèkalová) complemented with the presentation of the behaviour of man's next relatives - primates, shown in the section "Cousins or Brothers? - Ethology of Primates" (V. Vanèata). The new permanent exhibition presents up-to date discoveries from the field of archaeology, anthropology, genetics etc., and proposes interactive presentations using modern audio-visual techniques; it also contains several dioramas and reconstructions of the environment and life of Palaeolithic hunters and gatherers. Of course, the visitors will find there the popular mammoth model surrounded with its natural environment. Financial resources for the reconstruction of the pavilion and the creation of new exhibitions have been granted by the Ministry of Culture of the Czech Republic.
 


Klöster in diesem Ort / Monasteries in this city

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